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opinion on the topic. at 3:00, the united nations security council is meeting today to discuss the situation with israel and hamas and the gaza strip. we will have that for you live. the conflict in israel and gaza came up today during prime minister's question time in london. >> can i start by going the prime minister in paying tribute to capt. area of the royal regiment of scotland? he showed the utmost courage and bravery and all of our thoughts and condolences are with his family and friends. can i also express my deep sorrow about the loss of life and suffering in israel and gaza in recent days, including the latest terrorist attack on a bus in tel aviv. there is widespread support on all sides of the house for immediate and durable ceasefire being agreed in israel and gaza. so what will the prime minister set out in his view what are the remaining barriers to this cease-fire agreement being reached? >> i agree with the gentlemen about the appalling news this morning about the terrorist attack on a bus in tel aviv. can i also express our concern for the people in southern
was a terrorist attack. but that isn't what the u.s. ambassador to the united nations susan rice said when she went on national television five days after the attack. today rice is up on capitol hill. she's explaining what happened and some big-name republicans clearly are not very happy with her answers. our senior congressional correspondent dana bash is following what's become a pretty long day -- a tiring day for the u.s. ambassador to the u.n. what's the latest, dana? >> reporter: wolf, the three republican senators who had vowed to block susan rice from being secretary of state if the president nominates her had really softened the rhetoric in recent days. i'm told the reason for that was because it was a curtesy in order for them to wait until they had a face-to-face meeting with her which was today. after that meeting their criticism was harsher than ever. the way these grim-faced gop senators tell it, susan rice's attempt to calm their criticism backfired. >> we are significantly troubled by many of the answers that we got and some that we didn't get. >> i'm more disturbed now than i
immediate left the former head of united nations special commission on iraq, ambassador rolf ekeus is here with us from sweden. we have dr. ahmad sadri, professor of sociology and anthropology and the james p. gorter chair of islamic world studies at lake forest college, and when dr. jim walsh, research associate at the massachusetts institute of technology's security studies program. and with that come with asked each of them to take about five to seven minutes to provide their perspectives on three basic questions. with the new window of opportunity open for diplomacy, what are the next steps that each side can and should take to resolve proliferation concerns and reduce the risk of war, how might each side a just a respective proposals to get to a win-win situation for both sides, and what are the best, what's the best pass -- path for both parties to take to get there. could for instance, additional direct u.s.-iran talks help advance progress? and so we're going to hear from each of them for about five or seven and spirit afterwards will take questions from reporters first and then fr
collins, but clearly it is her responsibility as an ambassador to the united nations to do much more than that. >> before anyone can make an intelligent and decision, we need to do a lot more. to this date, we do not have the fbi interviews of the survivors from after the attack. we do not have the basic information about what was said about the night of the attack as of this date. i remember the episode pretty well. our democratic friends felt like they did not have the information needed to make the alteration to make about john bolton. democrats dug in their heels and a they were not going to consider the nomination until they would get basic answers to their concerns. the concerns i have far greater today there and they were before and we are not even close to getting a basic cancer. >> i have many more questions that need answering. >> that was about 10 minutes ago after meeting with u.n. ambassador susan rice, mentioned as a possible replacement for outgoing secretary of state, hillary clinton. coming up, more discussion on the so-called fiscal cliff this timeless and a majority wit
♪ backing down. what of the israeli truce? plus the u.s. ambassador to the united nations susan rice took some heat over her comments on the libya consulate attack. now it looks like though her critics have some ammunition against their claims. now she is going to go speak to some of them on capitol hill. benghazi and susan rice and is the tide turning? that's coming up from the journalists of fox news on this monday fox report. a hybrid? most are just no fun to drive. now, here's one that will make you feel alive. meet the five-passenger ford c-max hybrid. c-max says ha. c-max says wheeee. which is what you get, don't you see? cause c-max has lots more horsepower than prius v, a hybrid that c-max also bests in mpg. say hi to the all-new 47 combined mpg c-max hybrid. olaf gets great rewards for his small business! pizza! [ garth ] olaf's small busins earns 2% cash back on every purchase, ery day! helium delivery. put it on my spark card! [ pop! ] [ garth ] why settle for less? great businesses deserve great rewards! awesome!!! [ male announcer ] the spark business card from capital one. c
. it was the security council under the charter of the united nations that put that pressure. of course we know that this system worked extremely well. it was 100% performance as a matter of fact. it's not bad for any u.n. organization to get the task and then i think it's probably the only one which succeeded to make it 100% performance. so the -- that means that both destruction capabilities and the monetary capabilities were forcefully placed. so everything looked shiny and fine until the u.s. government -- it was in spring of 1997, through madeline albright made the statement at george mason university, well, it looks like sanctions are -- disarmament is going well. if it goes well we can still not lift the sanctions which was a condition under the security council. sanctions -- so we can't lift the sanctions until saddam hussein is removed. so that came my obsession with the regime change. that, of course, destroyed in the sense the institution and operations. so i think that experience -- could havi annan led the group to see if they can re-establish something similar and this report of w
and then the united nations following world war ii is no more. they are in dissent of the magnitude of human tragedies. the population exchanges, and the damage done to the infrastructure of the country. in the material sense, and we are talking about the country of 2 million people, and more than 25 million who have been displaced. only by a week ago, the refugees that were 160 # ,000, lebanon more, and jordan even at the same skill of turkey. our refugees, apart from those who are displaced within the country itself, and the regime in damascus cannot add to the control nearly 70% of the countryside of syria, and its urban centers, damascus and other parts, are battlegrounds between the oppositions and the regime so the -- before this started, reach today, march 15, 20 # 11, we could never think that we have too much -- march 14, 2011, it's over. the syria -- [inaudible] the question we face in turkey, the region, and all over the world, what we know is that the religion ended, and yet the paradox is religion is in place in damascus so the question is when and how -- what day we will see assad reigni
to the united nations in 2009 and said any world order elevates one nation among the other won't survive. he really i think came into office believing the world is safe fer america is less powerful. >> greta: but what was done. this administrations nts are in a position where they try to maintain or manage. you can't really correct any of these crisis in the world? >> he is not doing a very good job of maintaining or managing. to the extent he has success, whether it was the killing of osama bin laden, the drone program, that is building on programs that were started under the bush administration. at every turn whether you are talking about not leading any kind of stay behind force in iraq or announcing a date certain for our withdrawal from afghanistan, not supporting the people in iran when they rose up in 2009 in the green revolution, walking away from what solid support of democracy in the bush administration treating the war on terror like law enforcement officer but determining that we're going to bring terrorists on american soil. >> greta: it didn't happen. >> it didn't happen becaus
nations envoy. the united states doesn't have a presidential envoy to deal with this crisis. these are low-cost solutions. having that kind of international peace process that brings pressure to bear on the parties, rwanda supporting the rebels, uganda supporting the process, the government is creating problems in the east as well. they need to be preshed into looking at the root causes since this cycle of violence began. >> is there anything that people can link sometimes, you have people who are suffering, wars taking place in that area. >> yeah. thanks for asking for that because the link between all of us who buy these products, like laptops and cell phones, and the violence is congo is very direct. it's sourced from the congo. so a major international effort has -- is under way just like the blood diamonds movement a decade and a half ago for sierra leonne and trying to drive that international market, that supply chain to be a more peaceful and legally developed. so that's really the objective. join up in some of those international efforts, go on raisehopeforco raisehopeforco raiseh
to the united nations. the un security council is set to meet on the situation in the middle east. this afternoon, israel and moscow agreed to a ceasefire which went into effect at 2:00 eastern this afternoon. looks like the security council meeting may be getting away momentarily and we will take you there live once it does. earlier this afternoon, and jesse jackson, representative from chicago, jesse jackson jr. submitted his resignation to speaker john boehner. nancy pelosi posted a statement saying it is of great sadness that we're learning of this decision. his service in congress is marked by as eloquent advocacy for his constituents abuse and his advocacy. that is from nancy pelosi and her statement on the resignation of jesse jackson jr. today. let's take you live now to the security council meeting at the united nations and the situation in the middle east, the conflict between israel and homospory this is a live look here on c- span. [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2012] ba >> and the 6000 -- a me
egypt is better off with morsi and the muslim brotherhood. ambassador to the united nations john bolton joins us and joins us about this time every sunday. good morning ambassador. >> good morning. glad to be with you. >> as always. he calls what morsi did an unprecedented assault. others say the military should move in. what do you think could happen? >> i think the turmoil could well increase. morsi and the muslim brotherhood see it as not ex em player of fair minded group of judges but as the last strong hold of the mubarek era. it was the judges who through out the elections that had elected a parliament that was comprised of 75 percent supporters of the muslim brotherhood and even more extreme parties. morsi was trying to prevent the constitution writing exercise from being dismissed by the judg judges. in that sense this is a life and death struggle between what's left of the mubarek hold overs and that is key. from there the united states because of decades of ex tense i have military aid still has a lot of judges that's where we exert is it to get it back in control. that's wher
's because while opposed to her from her position as ambassador of the united nations and nothing could change my mind on that. bill: based on that answer it appears you are willing to take that answer higher than susan rice with it comes to benghazi. >> this will go down as the biggest coverup in history. they all knew it. they are hoping to have it go beyond the election date which it did. but people are not going to forget it. the administration deliberately covered this and misrepresented what happened in benghazi threatened up in the both of four people. one of whom was a good friend of mine, ambassador stevens. bill: the biggest coverup in american history. >> yes, sir. bill: when senator lieberman came out yesterday afternoon --'s listed as an independent. but he seemed to take more of a sill sill tory tone towards he -- he seemed to take more a conciliatory tone towards sue and rice. you wonder if this is a republican versus democrat issue. if that's the case, you are in the minority. >> that's true. senator lieberman is neither republican nor democrat but he's on the democrat s
at the united nations was talking about hateful videos. so many things need to be resolved. there are four committees in the house, four committees in the senate, all holding hearings, turf fights going on as there usually is and we need a select committee to sort this out. to find out what happened but also we can't ever again have a tragedy such as took place in benghazi. it could have have been prevented. now we have to make sure there are ways to make sure it doesn't happen. >> chris: you say you'll do everything in your power to block susan rice's nomination if the president names her to be secretary of state. she said this week that all she did was rely on the intelligence communities talking points and went on to say this about you. take a look. >> i do think that some of the statements he's made about me have been unfounded but i look forward to having the opportunity at the appropriate time to discuss all of this with him. >> chris: is there anything that embassador rice can do to shake your mind? >> change your mind? >> she can give everyone the benefit of explaining their petit
's dealing with syria gaza, the congo. she's still our representative to the united nations. so while we're talking this foolishness about her appearance on a tv talk show, what signal is that sending to the rest of the world? i do think they've got themselves backed in a corner now. i think the other agenda going on is the senate race. so i think that it needs to stop. i hope it will today. i know she's back on the hill again today. >> bill: she is. first of all, it is unfair at so many levels. i think it is sexist and racist. ambassador to the united nations, god knows is not responsible for security. embassies and consulates around the world number one. we talked about this earlier. number two, all she did in her appearance on the sunday shows and in her testimony right after the incident in benghazi on the hill was say here is what our intelligence agencies are telling us at this point. we don't know everything about it yet. you know. and that's -- that's kind of classic. you never know, right? immediately, al
job at the united nations and is highly qualified for any number of positions in the foreign policy arena. >> reporter: does the preside president -- >> i have no announcements. >> reporter: she's widely believed to be at the top of the list to replace secretary of state hillary clinton who's said she will not stay for a second term. ambassador rice came under fire for suggesting the benghazi attack that killed four americans was a spontaneous event. >> what we think transpired in benghazi is opportunistic extremist elements came to the consulate as this was unfolding. >> reporter: much later, the administration labeled it a terrorist attack, even though officials pointed to early language the president used referencing, quote, acts of terror. republicans pounced, focusing on the possible nomination of rice as secretary of state. >> we will do whatever is necessary to block the nomination. >> i am dead set on making sure we don't promote anybody that was an essential player in the benghazi debacle. >> reporter: we have been reaching out to senator mccain's office all day trying to g
the last few days about how the nation of egypt is really the key connection for the united states to both sides in the fight right now. and that was driven home today by the fact that when the cease-fire was announced, it was announced by u.s. secretary of state hillary clinton, and egypt's foreign minister at a press conference in egypt. >> in the days ahead, the united states will work with partners across the region to consolidate this progress, improve conditions for the people of gaza, provide security for the people of israel. ultimately, every step must move us toward a comprehensive peace, for all the people of the region. >> the leader of hamas held his own press conference in cairo today, during which he said that while his side agrees to the cease-fire, his fighters have, quote, their hands on the trigger. in jerusalem, the israeli prime minister, benjamin net ya hyan hew, also spoke about the cease-fire agreement. look at this. "prime minister benjamin netanyahu this evening spoke with u.s. president barack obama and acceded to his recommendation to give the egyptian cease-fir
at the appropriate time to discuss all of this with him. >> susan rice, u.s. ambassador to the united nations, speaking late today about her comments after the attack on the american consulate in benghazi in september. comments which john mccain would like to turn into the basis of a first giant confrontation. republican party which he believes he speaks for on foreign policy. and the newly re-elected president obama. joining us bob, great to have you here. happy thanksgiving. >> great to be here, rachel. >> could susan rice be secretary of state if the president wanted her to be? is this sort of john mccain spectacle trying to make an example out of her over now? >> you know, i don't know if it is over. i think he is going to keep on trying. i personally don't think that mccain can block this appointment if the president decides to make it. you know, it is really weird. you watch these clips and you watch all the times that mccain has been wrong and it is almost like slapstick, like this kind of hapless approach to foreign policy. the republicans are not just wrong on foreign policy on sunda
was approved, unanimously, or very strongly for her united nations position. to suggest that anyone is judging her on anything based other than on her record i think would be a big mistake, kirsten, i don't know what you think about that. >> clearly they've decided that that is the line of attack that they are going to take. have you have people like james klyburn, he's hardly a bit player,aying senator mccain is basically a racist for opposing her. it's demeaning to her. and she is a rhode scholar, a high ranking official even in the clinton administration. it's very demeaning to her to even do this. i think it's been set up that way. my point earlier was obama is emboldened by seeing that the media is just so complacent or stupid or whatever it is that they will not put together the pieces of how this story does not add up. it's so -- there are so many problems witness, but he thinks he can send the person up who he had be the face of benghazi, put her under oath and that it's not going to make any difference, it's not going to cause any problems for him says something either about his arrog
citizen. a liver in -- live in new york and cover the united nations. that is how i look at it from a national approach. what everyone to think about is going on in the region now, everyone is looking at washington, what will the new president of the united states, the president of a second term, do about what he promised to do. what looked at the 3 obama promises. the first promise was when he said he would not find a solution. -- let's look at the 3 obama promises. second from a that the president of the united states was when he said the united states would never allow iran to be a nuclear power. this is unprecedented, where there are bright -- but the right or wrong. this is a statement made by the president more than once. this was the collection of promises made to the indian prime minister. how has president obama of filled the promise? is he going to absolutely implement this? and what are the israelis do we? from my point of view, one of the activated parts of the operation is that they are giving hamas a leading creating a new dynamic for shaping the new dynamics and shapi
's chairmanship it will be the united states. there are only eight nations making up the arctic council, but the whole world is interested. china is interested in maritime commerce potential and the resources and the potential for a car rental catastrophes, which is very gigantic there as well. rescue missions, etc. what is the special burdens of canada and the united states with respect to the arctic council and should countries like china be allowed observance status? do think the next congress will ratify the treaty? if not, why not? >> the special burden, the role of the arctic council members, all of whom are democracies, one of the -- one of the underpinnings is a rules-based system. a respect for the rule of law. in addition to accountability to the people who elect you. canada has tremendous attachment and affection and over the largest part of the arctic. there are certain special obligations that come with that, stored ship of the environment. we have enormous interest in our own resources and our people. 40% of canadian land mass is above the 50th parallel, yet we only health
of the largest national organization of dreamers, united we dream. they will be planning their next effort, advocating for immigration reform legislation that will bring them and their families out of the shadows once and for all and give them a chance to earn their way to legal status and citizen thp in america. -- citizenship in america. one part of this immigration reform, the dream act is near and dear to me but i want to see comprehensive immigration reform before it is over. we know if we pass the dream act, it will help the economy, creating new jobs and economic growth when the talent of these young people, as they come out of high school and college is brought in our economy. in my home state of illinois, by 2030 the dream act will contribute $14 billion in economic activity, and dreamers would create up to 58,992 new jobs. i come to the floor to tell their stories. they used to hide in the shadows. they didn't want to talk about who they were because they were undocumented and afraid to be deported. many were deported. but i came to the floor to tell the stories of those who had
that would allow it to project force to the region without having to depend upon the host nation support. the second step that the united states reluctantly took towards assuming some of those same british commitments, came later on in the decade with the fall of the shah, and the iranian revolution in 1978 and '79. the u.s. had to rely on saudi arabia and iran in the aftermath of british withdrawal because of america's involvement in vietnam, and with the primary pillar, iran, one of the two twin pillars now gone, the united states had to figure out a way to project military power, since its surrogates would no longer shepherd after western interests in the region. we see here with the carter administration and the late -- late in the carter administration, the enunsation of what would become known as the carter doctrine. in his state of the union suppose in 1980, president carter said in no uncertain terms that an attack on western interests in the persian gulf represents an attack on u.s. vital national interests, and the u.s. will be prepared to use military force in defense of those
. margaret anderson was living her dream, working with her husband at mount rainier national park as a united states park ranger. her duties were not confined to patrolling, but ranged from supervision of snowplow areas to medical coordination and instruction for her fellow staff members. anderson was described by her colleagues as a candid and honest co-worker who could always bring a smile to your face. on new year's day, anderson blocked the road with her patrol car to hinder the escape of a man who crashed through a checkpoint. little did she know at that time that the man was a suspect in an earlier shooting that wounded four people. the suspect shot at her while she was still blocking the road with her patrol car and she was fatally wounded. mr. speaker, national park ranger margaret anderson made the ultimate sacrifice in the line of duty. i urge passage of this bill to honor her on behalf of all of our colleagues in the house, especially the washington dedication. and this -- passage of this bill is dedicated to her family and to the united states park service. i urge passage of h.r.
. >> thank you. >> coming up on c-span, live to new york city where the united nations security council is meeting to discuss the current middle east violence between israel and palestine. that is set for 330 eastern, again, on our companion network, c-span. tonight in prime time here on c-span2, author mark friedman discusses his new book, the big shift, navigating the new stage beyond midlife. he discusses how the baby boom generation is switching to new careers later in life. that begins at 8:00 p.m. eastern, again, here on c-span2. >> there are many people who might even take issue with grants saving the union during the civil war. didn't lincoln do that? well, yes, he did, and i'm not going to see grant was the only person to save the union, but he was the commanding general of the army's dumping of lincoln's policies into effect. he was the general who accepted the surrender of the army of northern virginia that ended the war. if anybody won the war on the battlefield, if you could say that any one person did, and of course you can't. one of the things we do in history is generali
down on these. you're right. a bipolar treaty between the united states and russia is nice but does not confront the nations of the rogue nation that you're talking about, and how do we deal with them. a no-use first strategy sends the message we won't strike first, but you better be prepared for retaliation. would you use them against iran for instance. >> yes i am convinced it would influence iran because it would force the people and it's government to think through what they're doing. right now every move they make is celebrated through a good part of the world because its striking a blow on israel and the united states and others. i can't guarantee that they won't use nuclear weapons but i can gather tee that they guarantee that they'll have to think through the consequences of it. >> eliot: you want to say no matter who you may be, you will suffer the consequences that we said to russia in the 50s and 60s under that regime. how do you counter proliferation and stop the inevitable acquisition of nuclear weapons by nations where there is not the stability that we would oh hope t
and around the nation took due note that something big was happening in texas. the new york times reported that president love it had attracted an array of the learning such as had seldom been assembled in the united states. another paper waxed mystically and observed that the president's speech coincided with the early evening appearance of both jupiter and venus and suggested that the evening sky was an all glory of a bright future for the institute. not every newspaper was as perceptive or trance jed -- transcended. one local journal reported the founding of rice in the same column that the news that congo, the largest circus elephant, was coming to town. as i said i will keep my remarks a great great great deal shorter, but i would like to close with a personal word of congratulations to the president on having the privilege to serve at rice during its centennial. i am delighted to have the opportunity to call him president once again. any of you who have been to supreme court note that the justices on that court are used to asking lawyers a lot of question period today we will turn th
used increasingly by law enforcement officials in the united states. host: mike lyons is a national security analyst. he served in the army and finished his career as executive officer to the deputy chief of staff for operations in the netherlands >>. leah is the next caller. caller: week received a grant money so the police could learn to do surveillance. they are coming into the neighborhoods. they are bringing the drones close to the roof levels banging the roofs causing sleep deprivation. there is no oversight. homeland security never set the committee a up. there is also a problem with health. when you use electromagnetic close to a person, it changes the charge of the cells that causes disease. host: what about the possible health impacts? guest: if you listened to any of the cable networks during the fighting in gaza over the past weeks, you heard that the sound of the unmanned vehicles. it is designed to be used positively to look at traffic patterns. it is designed to be used in ways to help the community. in fact, the crash. they create noise. those things are not consider
truths when you think about nations and companies, there are certainly rise and fall stories, and hopefully the united states is not on the fall side of this. but political campaigns are really lousy times to think about the hard truths of what's happening. one of the hard truths about our panel is we're five white guys. [laughter] we've tried to figure out how, how we could divvy -- we're four tall guys and doug. [laughter] and we're very well aware of in this. you would not believe how busy -- we did have a more diverse crowd, but i just want to say for all of you who are going to e-mail and say we'd love to have a conversation with you, we know. and it's there. but what i wanted to get into today and talk a little bit about are the strategic economic choices facing the nation and what does that mean, and particularly when you talk about strategy in economics, is there something more fundamental about the way the united states is positioned in the world, what its choices are? michael porter, who's here with us and just, michael, wave so they know who you are. we're all, you
to bring that forward. the diplomatic industrial and economic pieces of strategy of united states and for other countries are parts that are used to put forth those pieces that are best for those nations. however, there are some governments that do not and will not adhere to those things in the interest of the united states. if that is the case, we have to have places where we can bring troops into at a moment's notice or in a short period of time and ordered to be able to, when necessary, put forth military pace. host: you would be against the drawing down some of these bases around the world? caller: i agree that some of them are unnecessary. the military has taken that into account but i am listening to the ones she is talking about and i think that is not exactly the majority. host: which ones in particular are you concerned about with regard to countries? caller: places like japan. the base in germany, i could probably agree with that. in japan, you have a force of their in north korea. north korea is not a force that people should take lightly. guest: thank you, i think ther
to get into today and talk a little bit about are the strategic economic choices facing the nation. what does that mean? we talk about strategy and economics, is there something more fundamental about the way the united states is positioned in the world and its choices? michael has his own followers and accolades. jeff bingaman and i and our whole staff were riveted from much of his staff and guidance at the time. had he moved in along some of the issues we're talking about back then, the united states might not be in the same position. to his left, we have the smart guy who would have evolved from a would have come in that we could have seen as national security adviser. his deputy secretary the treasury under bush. he is a senior foreign policy ambassador to adjourn year -- germany and one of the few people who synthesizes the economic and the national security in such a holistic way. his dad was a famous democrat and was one of the reasons i moved to washington. to michael's right, we have doug holtz-eakin. he ran the congressional budget office and he is a very distinguished economis
the united states space program. representative hall has been an especially strong voice for our nation's human space flight program which has benefited not only tbs and florida but propoled our nation on the path of unprecedented scientific and technological advancement. we can all learn a lot from our colleagues. congressman hall leads by example. he's well known for calling a spade a spade. his word truly is his bond and you can always take that to the bank. advancing our nation's human space flight program has been a hallmark for chairman hall. as we look out at america's next general riggs of explorers, space is their destiny and he'll help ensure that they reach it. ralph, there's a lot of work to do and i'm truly honored by the opportunity to serve with you an get it done. i only hope and pray when i'm 65 years old that bill in half as good shape or half as active as you. mr. smith: i yield to minutes to the gentleman from texas, quico canseco. mr. canseco: i thank my friend and colleague for yielding to me. i rise to honor a great man, a great texan, and a great american, ralph
in the united states on the threat to build nuclear weapons by iran, i think the president doesn't want to fight another war. i think he is right in. that we have to engage in nation building at home, she right in tune with the american people. >> i think it's very clear the weak american leadership sent a signal to the middle east that we don't want to lead. iraq, one of more tragic aspects we lost over 4,000 brave young americans. we intended to leave a residual force. president didn't want to see it happen. we see iraq unrafblg. we see a dramatic increase to violence. they just condemned their vice president to death. al-qaeda is now set up training camps in western iraq. iranian airplanes are flying iraq from syria and our failure to intervene in any way and establishing a safe zone, al-qaeda is coming in there in droves. when this thing ends and all conflicts do end, we're going to have one heck of a time with the al-qaeda elements that have moved in to syria and it it's going to be very difficult. iranians continue on path to nuclear weapons. afghanistan is also unraveling to the degree th
free market economics you want talent and youth coming to this country. if you're a national security conservative, why is the united states going to run the world or be very important and powerful in the world in 100 years and japan isn't? because one, they forget to have kids and they don't do immigration. china, same thing. and europe the same thing. immigration is our competitive advantage against the rest of the world as an economic power, a military power. >> so what other wounds would you look at? >> that's one piece. i think we need to look at -- and our candidates. we ran a candidate, rahmny, who was a great guy much he's not what the 86% of obama's ads said about him. but how do you make the case of how rahmny would govern when he was governor of massachusetts for four years, pre-tea party. >> let's stipulate rahmny was a bad candidate. how would you get a better one? >> there are 30 republican governors. 24 of them have republican legislatures which is what rahmny didn't have. he had 83% democratic legislature. he was a goaly. they just shot goals on him for four years and
legislated to the united states senate and then the presidency who is beginning to grapple in a much more direct way than most of us ever have to with the implications of being responsible. for our national security, for making these decisions. it's not been remarked on enough, but it's fairly extraordinary that when he was, i think, very prematurely awarded the nobel peace prize being elected president, he shows up at oslow before the nobel peace committee and delivers what i think is probably the only pro-war speech ever given in acceptance of the nobel peace prize. he argues for the necessity of war, but argues for the necessity of american power and for his responsibility to use american power in the world. i think that was a fairly remarkable speech. that coupled with the fact that there is the remote targeting of suspected terrorists says to me that people's expectations about him as a sort of passist leaning president was misguided. he's clearly not that, and nothing shows that more than his decision to go after bin laden. now, when i talk about main characters in the story, forgiv
what you already pay for medicare part b. unitedhealthcare doesn't stop there. we'll cover 100% of your preventive services... like an annual physical and immunizations... and you'll have the flexibility to change doctors within one of the nation's largest networks, dedicated to helping you live a healthier life. other benefits can include vision and hearing coverage -- and the pharmacy saver program gives you access to prescriptions as low as $2... at thousands of pharmacies across the country, in retail locations like these. ♪ call to enroll today and enjoy these benefits... for a $0 monthly premium. most plans also include part d prescription drug coverage. your healthcare needs are unique. that's why, with over 30 years of medicare experience, we're here to guide you every step of the way. open enrollment ends december 7th. so don't wait. if you're medicare eligible, call now... and talk to unitedhealthcare about our plans, like aarp medicarecomplete. let's get you on the right path. call today. ♪ >>> the week began with volleys of rockets and missiles going back and forth betwe
of strategy for the united states and for other countries are parts that are used to i guess put forth those pieces that are the best for those nations, for their interest. however, there are some governments that do not and will not adhere to those things that are within the interest of the united states. if that is the case, then we have to have places that we can bring troops into at a moments notice and in a short period of time in order to be able when necessary to put forth a military piece. >> host: so you are against drawing down some of these bases around the world? >> caller: i would say i agree, some of them are unnecessary and the military has taken that into account but i'm listening to the ones that she is talking about and i'm going, that is not exactly -- >> host: which ones in particular are you concerned about? >> caller: i was listening to her talk about japan and the base in germany, i agreed. the military has looked at and taken account germany. you have a -- in north korea. north korea is not a place that people should take lightly. >> guest: thanks, kevin. there are a
of other nations, like the japanese, the south koreans, five nations surrounding the south china sea. they want twaoeu are taiwan. they are trying to deny the united states the rights to patrol international air and water space. i don't know how else to say this. china is a threat. jenna: they are building up their military, we are confronting sequestration, defense cuts when you look at the priorities around the world where do you place this? >> clearly it's not china we are not going to fight china the serious threat to our nation is still the middle east and south asia as we've seen in recent events and the big question in washington right now is how big of a presence or how big of a footprint are we going to leave in places like afghanistan? that seems to be the most serious question of the day, jenna. jenna: let's talk a little bit about that gordan. one of the thins we do see is china and it's private businesses, not necessarily private businesses going into afghanistan, setting up big mining companies and capabilities there. they of course were tphoeupbt solved in the war like
performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2012] >> i am proud and honored to introduce two individuals. he is a former staff sergeant of the united states army. he is the first living person to receive the armed forces medal of honor for actions that occurred after the and vietnam war perry dead -- be it now war. the major general was awarded the united states highest military decoration for heroic actions in 1968 during the vietnam war. he served on active duty in the marine corps over 33 years before returning in 1995. his last assignment was in new orleans, louisiana. his decorations include the medal of honor, silver star medal, a bronze star medal, the purple heart, and able accommodation nettle. i now present to you the staff sergeant and the major general. >> the start of this in 2006. jerry served at hotels and conference centers in new york and northern virginia. while serving as general manager as a resort in leesburg, he founded the national medal of honor society. 15 recipients participated. they went on to raise a total of $15
of the nation's most respected judges, legal scholars, lawyers, and policy analysts. the marquee event is tonight's program. the namesake of tonight's lecturer became the youngest associate justice ever to serve on united states supreme court when he was appointed by president madison in 1812. he made a significant mark on american law in his 33 years on the bench, but his greatest contribution is is renowned commentaries on the constitution. justice story a famously and correctly declared "a constitutional government is addressed to the common sense of the people and never was designed for trials of logical skills or visionary speculation." this lecture series celebrates his legacy in the law. prior lectures have been judge robert bork, professor john harrison, judge raymond randolph, and chief justice of the united states court of appeals of the sixth circuit. tonight, we're honored to add a fifth name to that prestigious list as a welcome justice anthony kennedy. justice kennedy received his bachelor of arts degree from stanford university and the london school of economics and his
already pay for medicare part b. unitedhealthcare doesn't stop there. we'll cover 100% of your preventive services... like an annual physical and immunizations... and you'll have the flexibility to change doctors within one of the nation's largest networks, dedicated to helping you live a healthier life. other benefits can include vision and hearing coverage -- and the pharmacy saver program gives you access to prescriptions as low as $2... at thousands of pharmacies across the country, in retail locations like these. ♪ call to enroll today and enjoy these benefits... for a $0 monthly premium. most plans also include part d prescription drug coverage. your healthcare needs are unique. that's why, with over 30 years of medicare experience, we're here to guide you every step of the way. open enrollment ends december 7th. so don't wait. if you're medicare eligible, call now... and talk to unitedhealthcare about our plans, like aarp medicarecomplete. let's get you on the right path. call today. ♪ >>> as president obama, mexico's president elect meet this hour, i want to tell you about a t
. -- posttraumatic stress disorder. they want to get involved. they contribute to our nation and communities. what they need more than anything else is a connection. they need an on ramp into society when they return. college, unit, our company. that is what we can do. we cannot do it alone. the va is facing serious challenges. have -- there are almost a million disability claims backlog. folks are waiting to find out if they will get care, if they would get payment, what is next. that can be a burden. these are all solvable problems. the challenge is isolated to the veterans community. these conversations are branching out. you do not have to be a veteran to support the movement. it does not matter who you voted for or how you feel about the war. we can be united and reassured that we do not repeat the mistakes of vietnam. last week there was a high- profile debate on domestic policy. the two presidential candidates that together as americans watched. there was a were you did not hear in that debate -- veteran. veterans was not considered a domestic policy priority. that has to change. in order f
a commission in the united states navy as a public affairs officer. her support of the military goes far beyond that of the service of her sons. dr. biden has co-sponsored with our first lady, michelle obama, the national initiative joining forces, providing support and expanding opportunities for veterans and active duty personnel and their families. that exemplifies the commitment to those who serve and who have served, and the strength of character of jill biden and of her home, the first state. i know delaware's citizens will honor their state's namesake, follow her as she comes to life in a few years and embrace those who sail in her for decades to come as she in turn honors the first state's legacy, and she sails the seas in defense of our nation and upholding her state's motto: freedom and liberty. and the navy motto, forever courageous. now, it's my happy privilege to introduce the sponsor of the uss delaware, dr. jill biden. [applause] >> thank you, secretary maybus, for that kind introduction. this is a very exciting day. as a proud military mom and a very delawarean, i am honored to
pay for medicare part b. unitedhealthcare doesn't stop there. we'll cover 100% of your preventive services... like an annual physical and immunizations... and you'll have the flexibility to change doctors within one of the nation's largest networks, dedicated to helping you live a healthier life. other benefits can include vision and hearing coverage -- and the pharmacy saver program gives you access to prescriptions as low as $2... at thousands of pharmacies across the country, in retail locations like these. ♪ call to enroll today and enjoy these benefits... for a $0 monthly premium. most plans also include part d prescription drug coverage. your healthcare needs are unique. that's why, with over 30 years of medicare experience, we're here to guide you every step of the way. open enrollment ends december 7th. so don't wait. if you're medicare eligible, call now... and talk to unitedhealthcare about our plans, like aarp medicarecomplete. let's get you on the right path. call today. ♪ >>> what did you learn today? >> i learned from tapper that too few of us pay attention to so
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